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Jen Hernandez RDN, CSR, LDN

Jen Hernandez is an award-winning registered dietitian and a board-certified specialist in renal nutrition. She has served as a renal dietitian in the kidney community in multiple dialysis clinics across multiple states, as well as with the National Kidney Foundation to help spread awareness of kidney disease and strive for prevention with early detection and interventions.




Credentials



  • Registered Dietitian (RD)

  • Board-Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition (CSR)

  • Licensed Dietitian (LD) in Florida, Minnesota, and Arkansas


Recognitions



  • Region 2 Dietitian Recognition Award by the National Kidney Foundation (2023)


Education



  • B.S. in Nutritional Sciences (The University of Arizona, 2011)

  • Dietetic Internship Graduate Certificate (Iowa State University, 2012)


Experience



  • Clinical Dietitian in hospital and long-term care settings, including dialysis and CKD patients (2013 - 2015)

  • Dialysis Clinical Dietitian for DaVita and Fresenius Dialysis Clinics in Texas, California, and Hawaii (2015 - 2020)

  • CKD Dietitian with National Kidney Foundation and Plant-Powered Kidneys (2017 - present)

  • Presented at numerous conferences for the Council on Renal Nutrition, National Kidney Foundation, and other peer medical and nutrition events.

  • Completed over 2,000 hours of patient care in the renal setting to become Board-Certified Specialist in Renal Nutrition.

  • Completed over 1,200 hours of supervised practice to become a Registered Dietitian.

  • Interviewed on many podcasts, articles, and magazines.






Our Editorial Process


We know there is so much information available online when it comes to a renal diet. We take the information we share on Plant-Powered Kidneys very seriously.

All blog articles are written and/or reviewed by registered dietitians, who have completed a minimum of 1,200 supervised hours through an accredited internship program, and passed a national registration exam.

Our board-certified renal dietitians (CSR) complete an additional 2,000 hours of nutrition counseling and teaching with kidney patients, as well as pass an additional national certification exam.

As dietitians, we are required to complete 75 hours of continuing education units every 5 years to keep abreast of current nutrition topics and to maintain our credentials. CSR dietitians must re-take their exam and provide evidence of 2,000 hours of nutrition counseling and patient teaching every 5 years to maintain their specialist certification.

Articles on our blog include references from sources such as the National Kidney Foundation, the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), as well as peer-reviewed articles and research on The National Institute of Health PubMed.

Additionally, articles are reviewed and updated annually to reflect any new research or information pertinent to the information we provide.

Please note this site is for general information only and should not be taken as personal nutrition advice. Consult with your healthcare practitioner before making any changes to your diet or lifestyle.

The Keto Diet for Kidney Disease

The Keto Diet for Kidney Disease: What CKD Patients Should Know

Even after many years of varying diet trends, the keto diet is still around. Is there a place for the keto diet for kidney disease?

With stage 3, stage 4, transplant or any other stage of kidney disease, there are important factors to consider when it comes to a diet- ketogenic or not.

Let’s dive into what the keto diet for ckd patients is all about!

The Keto Diet for Kidney Disease: What CKD Patients Should Know Read More »

Electrolytes and Kidney Disease: Sodium, Potassium and More!

When you think of the words “minerals and kidney disease” or “electrolytes and kidney disease” what do you think of? Do you just think of sodium, potassium and phosphorus, or do you think about things like calcium, magnesium or selenium?  Sodium, potassium and phosphorus are the three main mineral and electrolyte players when it comes

Electrolytes and Kidney Disease: Sodium, Potassium and More! Read More »

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